Motor Age Garage

  • When our dispatcher went shopping for the car of his dreams, he bought his wife a gorgeous 1998 Continental at the Lincoln-Mercury dealer. It was in perfect condition, the test-drive went well, and he plunked down the cash.
  • Just about every experienced technician on the planet who has been around during the past 20 years would like to have a dollar for every oxygen sensor he or she has replaced.
  • It came into the dealership on the hook as a no-start, as yellow as a lemon and actually in pretty good shape, with what seemed to be a good track record. The speedo clock registered enough miles to have circled the planet four times as the crow flie
  • Remember how some folks used to complain about cold fast-idle settings that seemed too high? Some people wouldn't have even noticed ...
  • I’m not the first automotive technician who has put words on paper about many of our customers’ pie-in-the sky ideas about that mythical, all-powerful ‘Machine’ we have stashed in the service bay that will tell us which bolts
  • After an engine wash, a 1984 Jeep CJ starts sputtering and skipping, and the owner turns to Contributing Editor Richard McCuistian for help.
  • Ford F150 pickup with stalling, no-start problem.
  • After repairing collision damage, the body shop turns to Contributor Richard McCuistian to find out why a 1995 Dodge Ram pickup won't start.
  • The first time we saw this 1997 F150 was nearly six years ago, and it was a high mileage vehicle even then. The owner originally took it to an independent shop because it had lost oil pressure, and that shop removed the engine, replaced the rod and m
  • Whether it's dealing with customers who for anything short of free will not do, to teaching students how to be technicians, gumption is a necessary tool in our toolboxes to get today's vehicles repaired and back on the road. Two vehicles recently gav
  • Upsell is the name of the game in any service or retail related industry. And in an after-the-work rundown, those systems analysts who specialize in automotive service always can poke around on a car and find something a technician could have sold th
  • Cars and wires are inseparable. Remove wires and nothing works. Just about every machine we use in our daily lives depends on metal fibers protected by colorful nonconductive sheathing. Networking in new vehicles has reduced the amount of wiring some
  • Today's transversely mounted V6 engines are stuffed in really tight engine compartments, particularly in minivans, and handling heat on those platforms is always a serious concern. A healthy emission-friendly engine generally needs to run no cooler t
  • The e-mail explained a repair gone wrong, and it was not a good situation. It served as a reminder that repairs done wrong can be devastatings, and some of these situations happen because some shops tend to hire people that haven't been properly trai
  • The Dodge Stratus came to us with three primary concerns, and Ethan tackled the MIL concern first. But there was a PO128 code, and we found that the thermostat had literally broken. But other vehicles were not as easy to fix.
  • One of the most beneficial things about fixing real cars in an automotive program like mine is that hands-on repair jobs really shorten the learning curve. Live work jobs give automotive students in training a sense of purpose and direction, and the
  • My spare ride is a 1980 model Ford pickup with a 300 straight six. While I enjoy tinkering with cars and trucks at work with my students, having to fix one of my own when it breaks is like having to repair the lawn mower when it's time to cut the gra
  • One Moody pickup
  • A 1986 Toyota Cressida provides valuable lessons to Contributing Editor Richard McCuistian