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Adjusting clutch control valves

Monday, September 29, 2014 - 07:00
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Have you ever installed a TF80, TF81 or a TF60 after overhaul and it has had harsh shifts or engagements or maybe there is a flare/bump up shift, or just maybe it has harsh coast down clunks? Most times, clearing the shift adapts and driving the vehicle to relearn the shifts will correct these annoying problems. After a good long test drive to relearn the shift adapts, sometimes a shifting or engagement problem remains. Assuming that there is not excessive wear in the valve body and the linear solenoids are good, the clutch control valves on the valve body can be adjusted to correct these problems.

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First let’s get a little background on these valve bodies and clutch control valves. The TF60 is also known as a 09G used in Volkswagens and Mini Coopers, the TF80 is used in Volvo and GM in the United States and the TF81, (also known as AF21), is used in Ford and Mazda vehicles in the United States.

The TF60, TF80 and TF81 transmissions have the same solenoid firing order, the same clutch and band application and all three use clutch control valves and linear solenoids to control the shifts and engagements. All three of these transmissions are adaptive learn and need to have the shift adapts cleared and then the vehicle must be driven to relearn the shift adapts. Ford, Mazda and Volvo seem to relearn the shift adapts quickly, but Volkswagen seems to take the longest to relearn.

Clutch and Band Application Chart

VW TF60            K1      K2     K3      B1       B2     F1

TF80 & TF81

 C1

 C2

 C3

 B1 

  B2

 F1

Park

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reverse

 

 

  On

 

  On

 

Reverse

Above 4 mph

 

 

  On

 

   

 

Neutral

 

 

 

 

 

 

Drive 1st

  On

 

 

 

 

  On

Drive 2nd

  On 

 

 

  On

 

 

Drive 3rd

  On

 

  On

 

 

 

Drive 4th

  On

  On

 

 

 

 

Drive 5th

 

  On

  On

 

 

 

Drive 6th

 

  On

 

  On

 

 

Manual low

  On

 

 

 

  On

  On

The B1 is a band on the TF81 and a clutch on the TF80 and TF60.

As you can see by the clutch and band apply chart, the four clutches, (K1, K2, K3 and B1), control at least one of the shifts or engagements. These four clutches use clutch control valves to regulate the engagement of the clutches.  As an example, the K3 controls the reverse engagement, the 2-3 shift and the 4-5 shift. The linear solenoids that control the clutch control valves are pulsed off to apply the clutch. When the solenoid is electrically off the solenoid is flowing maximum oil to the clutch control valve.

Aisin FWD.6spd. Solenoid Firing Order

TF60 solenoid names –  N92    N282    N90    N283   N88   N89   N93     N91

TF80 solenoid names - SLC1  SLC2   SLC3  SLB1  SS1    SS2  Throttle TCC

TF81 solenoid names -  SSC     SSD      SSE    SSF   SSA   SSB   PCA   TCC

Park

   On

   On

  On

  On

 

 

     *

 

Reverse

   On

   On

+Off

  On

  On

  On

     *

 

Neutral

   On

   On

  On

  On

 

 

     *

 

Drive 1st

   Off

   On

  On

  On

 

 

     *

 

2nd

   Off

   On

  On

  Off

 

 

     *

 

3rd

   Off

   On

  Off

  On

  P

  P

     *

     X

4th

   Off

   Off

  On

  On

  P

  P

     *

     X

5th

   On

   Off

  Off

  On

  P

  P

     *

     X

6th

   On

   Off

  On

  Off

  P

  P

     *

     X

Manual 1st

   Off

   On

  On

  On

  On

  On

     *

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

         

 

 

                 
* = varies with engine load.    X = capable of lock up in these gears.

+ = Reverse is inhibited above 4 mph. by turning ON this solenoid.

P = Solenoid is on momentarily during the shift.      

A clutch control valve line-up consists of a linear solenoid, clutch control valve, spring and adjuster.

How it works: The solenoid is pulsed off, the solenoid sends oil to the end of the clutch control valve, compressing the spring against the adjuster. As the solenoid pulses the clutch control valve moves down the bore, it regulates line pressure to the clutch and accumulator. If, during the solenoid pulsing, the valve does not move far enough down the bore, the result will be not enough pressure regulated to the clutch and a flared shift. If the flare is long enough, the TCM will raise line pressure to get the clutch applied and the result will be a flare/bump shift. Conversely, if the clutch control valve moves too far down the bore during solenoid pulsing, the result will be too much pressure regulated and a harsh shift. You can see the importance of the proper spring tension on the clutch control valve. If you have a delayed engagement or flared shift you would want to turn the adjuster counterclockwise to decrease spring tension and allow the valve to move a little farther, regulating more pressure to the clutch.

As an example, say that you have a delay into reverse and a 2-3 flare. You would turn the K3 or C3 adjuster counterclockwise.

There are several reasons why you may need to adjust a clutch control valve.

  1. Clutch pack clearance may be different than OEM, always check the thickness of replacement steels and frictions.
  2. Bonded pistons may be worn allowing clutch pressure to leak.
  3. Sealing rings may not be sealing correctly.
  4. Slight wear in the valve body or accumulator.

The most common shift/engagement complaints are:

•        Delay /bump into reverse, 2-3 flare/bump and 4-5 flare.

•       3-4 flare bump or 3-4 neutral.

•       Harsh 1-2 and 5-6, (sometimes 5-6 feels fine).

The adjustment depends on how severe the problem is.

delay into reverse with a small flare on the 2-3 = K3/C3 turn adjuster counter clockwise ¾ turn.

A delay/bump into reverse, 2-3 flare bump & 4-5 flare = K3/C3 turn adjuster counter clockwise 1 ½ turns. For just a slight flare on the 2-3 turn the K3/C3 adjuster counter clockwise less depending on the amount of flare.

A 3-4 slight flare = turn the K2/C2 adjuster counter clockwise 1 turn.

A 3-4 flare/bump = turn the K2/C2 adjuster counter clockwise 1 ¼ – 1 ½ turns.

A 3-4 neutral = turn the K2/C2 adjuster counter clockwise 2 – 2 ¼ Turns.

A firm 1-2 with no flair = turn the B1 adjuster clockwise ¾ - 1 turn.

The 1-2 shift can really be tough to determine if the shift is harsh or if the TCM is commanding high line pressure because it does not see the commanded ratio. Keep in mind, the K1/C1 and the one-way mechanical clutch are on in first gear and when second is commanded on the K1/C1 remains on and the one-way clutch free wheels when the B1 is applied. If the B1 is commanded but does not come on, the transmission will still be driving in first. If the 1-2 shift is late a few seconds after the command, the TCM will command maximum line pressure to get the B1 applied and you get a harsh shift. This is a late shift because of too much spring tension on the B1 Clutch Control Valve, so you would turn the B1 adjuster counter clockwise to remove some of the spring tension. The key is to know if the shift is on time or late. Most Volkswagen cars show the gear command on the instrument cluster for an 09G equipped vehicle, which is a big help.

See figures 1, 2 and 3 for adjuster locations.

Remember; always try to relearn the TCM first. Follow all of the rules; no codes, transmission at operating temperature, drive vehicle at 20 – 25% throttle angle through all of the gears and then allow 20 – 40 seconds to slowly come to a stop so that the TCM can relearn the coasting downshifts. The relearn can take as little as 15 minutes on a Ford, about 20 to 30 minutes on a Volvo and 30 plus minutes on a Volkswagen. Remember that Volkswagen takes longer to relearn and the shifts may deteriorate before the relearn is complete. Only after a relearn should you try any adjustments. Short cutting the relearn to perform adjustments right away can cause you to have to pull the pan again to make still more adjustments.

When making adjustments to the Clutch Control Valve adjusters, you will find that each adjuster has a spring steel retaining clip that snaps over the adjuster to keep the adjuster from moving on its own. I would highly recommend leaving the retainer in place during the adjustment. If you feel the need to remove the adjuster, be very careful that the retainer does not get away from you and shoot across the shop, never to be found again. The adjuster must have a retaining clip installed before the pan goes back on.

The key is to match your shift quality concern with the clutch application chart to determine which clutch control valve needs to be adjusted and then determine which way to turn the adjuster by the way the shift feels.

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