Opinion | Commentary

  • There are things you can do to that may increase your multiple like building scale or investing in training and technology. But in general, the primary way to increase the value of your business is to improve your financials. Here are 5 simple ways to increase the value of your business.
    Brad Mewes
  • One of the first things we do when working with clients (helping them sell or helping them expand) is to perform a business valuation. Valuations are important because they set a baseline. It answers the question ‘what is my business worth?"
    Brad Mewes
  • But strength in numbers may not necessarily equate to an enhanced overall customer experience. 
    Michael Giarrizzo
  • Insurance providers and vehicle owners have increasing expectations for excellent service, rapid repairs and low costs. The result is additional investments in process and procedures like lean, 6 sigma and kaizen.
    Brad Mewes
  • I certainly believe that increasing technological complexity fundamentally changes the industry. And, depending on your inclination and your time horizon, it can either be seen as a huge opportunity or a huge threat.
    Brad Mewes
  • There are 3 main areas I see that will continue to impact the industry: technology, consolidation, and monetary policy, i.e. the Fed. Here are 3 collision industry predictions for 2016.
    Brad Mewes
  • Because of the everyday personal relationship I have with the industry, I find myself constantly evaluating the industry's ongoing progress and the many outside resources that help to create an improved customer experience that enhances the overall perception of our business.
    Michael Giarrizzo
  • Learn six non-financial ways to increase the value of your business.
    Brad Mewes
  • To ensure that your business does not become an unsellable company, here are three proven ways to sell a collision repair business.
    searchautoparts
  • To create a business that builds generational wealth, it is important to understand the different options available to a business to achieve that growth. 
    Brad Mewes
  • Like it or not, aluminum is now here for the masses and more OEMs will be utilizing it in the coming years.
    searchautoparts
  • I often ask business owners, paint and body technicians, customer service representatives, estimators and other members of the team the following important question: “Why is there never enough time to do the job right the first time; however, there is always time to go back and do it again?” 
    Mike Jones
  • Regardless of what stage of your career you are in, others’ experiences can lead to valuable knowledge for continued growth and success.
    searchautoparts
  • Responses to early career injuries were creative but not always ideal.
    searchautoparts
  • A common misconception is that organic growth is less risky and less costly than inorganic growth. But as humans we are actually inherently bad at assessing risk. Referred to as probability neglect, we assume that common activities we engage in are inherently safer and less risky than less uncommon activities.
    Brad Mewes
  • When considering growth by acquisition, a lot of time is spent identifying and quantifying synergies. Synergies are advantages that come about through the integration of two companies that, individually, the two companies would be unable to achieve. There are three common types of synergies: revenue, cost, and financial.
    Brad Mewes
  • I do not believe that .25 percent increase will materially change the M&A market, in the automotive industry, or otherwise. The reality is that most businesses do not collapse because of a .25 percent change in lending rates.
    Brad Mewes
  • One of my early lessons was that on occasion you might need to “fire” a customer. I’ve personally only done it once, and it became somewhat of an epic story.
    searchautoparts
  • We all know it’s too easy for that follow-up to fall through the cracks. That’s why I believe you need to have a standard operating procedure in place, and one or more people responsible for that follow-up.
  • The year-end floodgates appear to have opened after what appeared to be a relatively slow year for mergers and acquisitions in the collision industry when compared to 2014.
    Brad Mewes