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Scheduling repairs for anticipated vacancies is sustainable

Wednesday, May 17, 2017 - 06:00
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Often when I am researching a cycle time problem at a shop I generally end up teaching scheduling. There are many ways to schedule repairs. Most people are familiar with the “In on Monday out on Friday process.” Even though that process is extremely outdated it is broadly used at the insistence of insurance carriers.

I have visited shops with full parking lots who think they are busy, but realistically, nothing is moving. The repairs are all scheduled, regardless if a technician is available to work on them, just because it is Monday.

I recommend scheduling for anticipated vacancies, a process that requires a little work upfront but, once in place, it is very effective. To schedule effectively you must know your capabilities. How many repairs did you perform over the last 90 days?  Now, how many of those were delivered on time? Next, how many of those repairs were below $1,500? Were you aware that on average more than 45% of all repairs are $1,500 and below? 

OK, enough of the questions, let’s look at an average week at an average shop. To me average is five repairs a day in and five repairs out. Your shop will probably be a little different but the idea will work in any shop with a few adjustments.

In a 90-day period there are 60 working days. Using five repairs a day for these calculations we would have 300 repair slots within that 90-day period. As we break this down to a weekly schedule 48% of those repairs will be below $1500 or Level 1, the remainder will be split up between Level 2 = $1,500-$2,500 (20%), Level 3 = $2,500-$4,500 (16%), Level 4 = $4,500-$7,500 (12%) & Level 5 $7,500 and above (5%).

Weekly Schedule = 25 Repairs

(Rounding adds one additional Level 1 Repair)

Level 1

12

Level 2

5

Level 3

4

Level 4

3

Level 5

1

 

Now that we know the repair mix let’s put them in a scheduling table to see how it looks.

Monday

Level 1

Level 1

Level 1

Level 2

Level 4

Tuesday

Level 1

Level 1

Level 1

Level 2

Level 3

Wednesday

Level 1

Level 1

Level 2

Level 3

Level 4

Thursday

Level 1

Level 1

Level 2

Level 3

Level 5

Friday

Level 1

Level 1

Level 2

Level 3

Level 4

 

 

While I used five repairs a day for this example, this table can be expanded to allow for eight, nine or 10 repairs a day. Just use 90 days of data to determine what percentage of each repair level you should bring in each day.

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